Sanar’s 2018 #ArtOfHealing Campaign

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At Sanar, the #ArtOfHealing is the way each person is able to transform traumatic experiences of their past as they pave their own unique path towards resilience and thriving. Your support enables us to provide long-term therapeutic services for survivors of gender-based violence and human trafficking in Northern New Jersey and New York City. At Sanar we empower every person to explore their own healing process through sensory practices such as expressive arts, music, aromatherapy, mindful meditation, and restorative yoga. These critical support allows survivor of violence to fully build a happy and healthy life after trauma.

Each week we are inspired by the artwork participants create in Sanar’s Wellness Center. Expressive arts is an evidence-based practice that enables survivors to process their trauma through various mediums, build self-esteem by discovering talents, and find new and safe ways to tell their story.

This year we are celebrating the unique nature of the #ArtOfHealing and we have asked our supporters to share what healing looks like for them through their own art. We will be sharing artwork from November 27 - December 11, so be sure to follow us on social media!


We asked:
“What does the #ArtOfHealing look like?”
This is what our supporters said:

  Carrie Cabush  is a masters level social work intern at Sanar. She uses the written word to express what is often left unsaid, in the hopes of shining a light into the darkness and paving the way for new possibilities. For Carrie, the  #artofhealing  can be messy, but is always beautiful.

Carrie Cabush is a masters level social work intern at Sanar. She uses the written word to express what is often left unsaid, in the hopes of shining a light into the darkness and paving the way for new possibilities. For Carrie, the #artofhealing can be messy, but is always beautiful.

 Carmelle Beaugelin considers herself a "visual theologian" who is passionate about bridging gaps between pneumatology, spirituality, art, and culture. Ayiti Beyond the Mountains is a Taino-Haitian influenced wordplay based on Haiti’s Indigenous Taino name “Ayiti” meaning, “Mountainous Land”. The Haitian Proverb, Dye mon, gen mon (Beyond the Mountains, more Mountains) is commonly used among Haitians to express that with every trial that presents itself, another trial follows. This is especially true of the Island of Haiti, the first free Black Republic in the Americas, often plagued by political unrest, natural disasters, and demonizing archetypes by its historical oppressors. Ayiti Beyond the Mountains, or The Mountainous Land Beyond the Mountains seeks to disrupt this narrative, viewing the high lands of Haiti as seen from its Diaspora on airplanes approaching Port-Au-Prince: Fertile, Promising, and Clothed in the bright colors of Carnival.

Carmelle Beaugelin considers herself a "visual theologian" who is passionate about bridging gaps between pneumatology, spirituality, art, and culture. Ayiti Beyond the Mountains is a Taino-Haitian influenced wordplay based on Haiti’s Indigenous Taino name “Ayiti” meaning, “Mountainous Land”. The Haitian Proverb, Dye mon, gen mon (Beyond the Mountains, more Mountains) is commonly used among Haitians to express that with every trial that presents itself, another trial follows. This is especially true of the Island of Haiti, the first free Black Republic in the Americas, often plagued by political unrest, natural disasters, and demonizing archetypes by its historical oppressors. Ayiti Beyond the Mountains, or The Mountainous Land Beyond the Mountains seeks to disrupt this narrative, viewing the high lands of Haiti as seen from its Diaspora on airplanes approaching Port-Au-Prince: Fertile, Promising, and Clothed in the bright colors of Carnival.

 Sarah Cassidy is an artist and tech professional living in Brooklyn. She works in acrylics, painting surfaces of water and the sea. The art of healing is very tied in with Sarah's work.  Her paintings are designed to make you feel like you are viewing the ocean from a pier. It is a calming feeling to watch the sea, and she wants to recreate that feeling when she is not standing next to water. The act of creating the paintings is relaxing and expressive, and the healing feeling continues even when the painting is created.

Sarah Cassidy is an artist and tech professional living in Brooklyn. She works in acrylics, painting surfaces of water and the sea. The art of healing is very tied in with Sarah's work.  Her paintings are designed to make you feel like you are viewing the ocean from a pier. It is a calming feeling to watch the sea, and she wants to recreate that feeling when she is not standing next to water. The act of creating the paintings is relaxing and expressive, and the healing feeling continues even when the painting is created.

 

Together we can help survivors move from surviving to thriving!

Heather Mae writes music for the light seekers and the good-troublemakers. Dubbed “the new queer Adele” by L-Mag, Heather Mae is using her music to shed light on issues not often heard in pop music, such as body positivity, racial justice, and LGBTQ rights. In September 2019 she is adding another title to her resume: mental health advocate. Mae has taken her personal struggle with Bipolar Disorder 2 and Depression and turned it into a record, entitled GLIMMER. The release that comes from freeing her mind of anxious thoughts, placing them into a melody, singing them out, releasing them to the universe, and sharing them on stage for the audience to connect with and feel the relief of knowing they aren't alone in THEIR pain - it's power in art unlike any she has ever experienced.

The Barat Foundation is a not-for-profit educational corporation dedicated to the power of the arts to transform lives and level the playing field for highly motivated, underserved youth. For the Barats, the #artofhealing means the power of art to address trauma, not by erasing its scars, but by providing an opportunity to reach deep beyond the surface of the every day, and touch the central core of our being, which is universal and shared. Check out this video from the 2018 Creation Nation Art & Peace Parade in Newark!

 Libby Clarke is an artist in Maplewood, NJ. Her current mode of work is the making of hand-lettered signs. She started making one positive protest poster a day on July 4 to protest the antagonism and fear-mongering in politics. It has morphed into a practice wherein she creates loving signals for others to keep in their homes. Libby now operates under the name @gohighsigns to remind herself to stay in the light.

Libby Clarke is an artist in Maplewood, NJ. Her current mode of work is the making of hand-lettered signs. She started making one positive protest poster a day on July 4 to protest the antagonism and fear-mongering in politics. It has morphed into a practice wherein she creates loving signals for others to keep in their homes. Libby now operates under the name @gohighsigns to remind herself to stay in the light.

 
 
 
 
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Activate YOUR Community By:

Sharing Your Artwork On Social Media with the Hashtag #ArtOfHealing
Sharing Sanar's #ArtOfHealing Campaign on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter
Raising Awareness in Your Community About Trauma Recovery